Tag Archives: #artisansofflorence

Galileo’s legacy

Can you imagine what the world would be like without science, global telecommunications or modern medicine?

Galileo Galilei (1564 – 1642) the Italian scientist, astronomer and mathematician is best known for his fearless and pioneering work in science, physics and astronomy. Considered to be the ‘father of modern science’, Galileo challenged the beliefs of the time and paid a high price.

With his powerful telescope, he was able to demonstrate the theory held by Nicolaus Copernicus and other scientists that the sun is at the centre of our universe, not the Earth. He was tried by the Roman Inquisition, forced to stop teaching and publishing his ideas which were considered heretical, and kept under house arrest until his death.

Galileo: Scientist, Astronomer, Visionary is the world’s first interactive exhibition on Galileo’s groundbreaking science, influential discoveries and inspirational life. The exhibition opened at Canterbury Museum in Christchurch, New Zealand on 19 June.

The story of how Galileo’s discoveries four hundred years ago shaped our modern world is told through the themes of Astronomy, Simple Machines, Gravity, Motion and Time, and Military and Inventions. The section on Experimental Science is dedicated to examining Galileo’s extraordinary legacy.

Galileo: Scientist, Astronomer, Visionary. Photo courtesy of Canterbury Museum, Christchurch

For details on the exhibition visit; www.artisansofflorence.com/exhibitions/galileo-scientist-scholar-visionary/

A night with Galileo

Italian Renaissance scientist Galileo Galilei changed the world with his inventions and experiments – but his latest discovery is top secret.

Over three nights in July aspiring sleuths have the opportunity to crack the “Galileo Code”. As part of Galileo: Scientist, Astronomer, Visionary at Canterbury Museum in Christchurch, NZ, visitors are invited to explore the museum at night.

Kids under 16 will enjoy solving the clues, revealing the codeword and discovering Galileo’s inventions that changed the world.

13th, 14th and 15th July 2021
6pm – 8pm

Visit Stuff NZ to take a sneak peek with Artisans of Florence Director Tom Rizzo who demonstrates and discusses some examples of Galileo’s groundbreaking science featured in the family-friendly interactive exhibition.

Image courtesy of Stacy Squires/ Stuff NZ

“The purpose of the Artisans of Florence’s exhibitions is getting people to understand the long arc of science through interacting with hands-on exhibits.”
– Tom Rizzo, Director

The father of modern science

The moon landing, space exploration, satellites and global telecommunications, telescopes, navigation at sea, medical instruments that measure heart rate and even the clock…None of these would have been possible without the discoveries of Galileo!

‘Galileo: Scientist, Astronomer, Visionary’ is now open at Canterbury Museum, Christchurch NZ. There are more than 60 experiments and inventions by the “father of modern science”.

Learn how Galileo’s fearless and pioneering work in Science, Physics, and Astronomy four centuries ago has shaped our modern world. 

Installation view of Galileo: Scientist, Astronomer, Visionary (2021). Photo courtesy of Canterbury Museum

The nature of genius

What do the world’s greatest thinkers, scientists, artists, and visionaries have in common?

Archimedes of Syracuse, Leonardo Da Vinci and Galileo Galilei drew on the scientific knowledge of their times. They observed, measured, and imagined. They challenged widely accepted and long-held beliefs and created new knowledge. Each of them tested their hypotheses and adjusted their theories. Their discoveries changed the course of history.

We have the privilege of touring the iconic machines and exhibits based on the groundbreaking works of these geniuses. In the process of creating our exhibitions, the Artisans make discoveries of their own and unravel mysteries that bring us closer to understanding the nature of genius.

Not many of us will ever have the impact on the world that Archimedes, Da Vinci and Galilei have had, but we can learn from them.

In the words of the German philosopher, Arthur Schopenhauer:

Talent hits a target no one else can hit;
Genius hits a target no one else can see

How Galileo’s discoveries shaped us

The moon landing, space exploration, satellites and global telecommunications, telescopes, navigation at sea, medical instruments that measure heart rate, and even the clock…

None of these would have been possible without this man…

Galileo: Scientist, Astronomer, Visionary is on at Waikato Museum, Hamilton, New Zealand until 7 June 2021.

Explore and experience the art of science through hands-on, interactive experiments and exhibits.

Find out how Galileo’s fearless and pioneering work in Science, Physics and Astronomy 400 years ago shaped our modern world.

Galileo’s professional rivalry

While teaching as head Mathematician at Padua University, Galileo became embroiled in an ongoing and heated public debate with his colleague Cesare Cremonini, a renowned Natural Philosopher.

Cremonini, who followed the Aristotle school of belief that the planets (including the sun) orbit the Earth publicly denounced Galileo writing; It is hard to realize what a fundamental blow to all Natural Philosophy it would be if a mere Mathematician could prove actual change in the heavens.

As Cremonini believed that heavenly bodies were created by God, he argued that Galileo’s measurements could not be accurate because he was using mortal instruments to measure the divine.

Galileo responded by publishing a well-reasoned discussion, in colloquial dialect rather than high Latin, between two rural peasants.

One of the peasants remarks: When it comes to measuring things we shouldn’t trust Philosophers, after all, what have they ever measured? We should instead trust in the measurements of the Mathematicians who care not whether something is fashioned from the divine or from polenta, because their measurements will still hold true.

Did you know that Galileo was the first scientist to measure heart rate?

At a young age, while watching a lamp swinging in the Pisa Cathedral, Galileo discovered that each full swing of a pendulum takes exactly the same amount of time regardless of whether the arc of the swing is wide or narrow. He used his own pulse to measure the time of each of the lamp’s swings. Many years later after studying medicine at the University of Pisa he used this knowledge to create the Harmonic Oscillator, a machine that accurately measures the human heart rate.

Scientist rebel

Galileo (1564-1642) challenged some of the fundamental knowledge of his time, providing proof that certain long held beliefs were incorrect, and paving the way for a better scientific future.

In his time it was accepted that the Earth was at the centre of the universe and the planets, including the sun, rotated around it. Thanks to Galileo’s tenacious observation of the natural world with his new and ultra powered telescope,  coupled with his meticulous note taking, he was able to plot the movements of the planets around the sun.

Welcome to our blog

In anticipation of the world premiere of the Galileo: Scientist, Astronomer, Visionary exhibition in February 2021 we would like share with you some of our most intriguing findings about the Italian scientist, astronomer and mathematician. While some of these facts are obscure, Galileo’s discoveries four centuries ago enabled great paradigm shifts in science, and paved the way for space travel in the 20th and 21st Centuries.